Unlike approaches based on ideology, suc…

Posted: December 22, 2010 in quote
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Unlike approaches based on ideology, successful anti-bullying programs are quite practical and concrete: They use anonymous surveys to sample the current climate within the school. Then they go about changing the culture of the school by working primarily on bystander behavior. They make it OK for students to report bullying by altering the notion of what students consider tattling.

Successful anti-bullying efforts address precursor behaviors to bullying, like exclusion, with rules that children understand – “You can’t say, ‘You can’t play.’ ” And, while good programs do not blame the victims, they do include social skills instruction for children who are picked on to help reduce the chances they will continue to be victimized.

Most important, successful programs change the bystander behavior of adults. They challenge false beliefs among teachers and parents about the nature of bullying – that being bullied “builds character,” that “boys will be boys.” In short, they make clear that adults must not stand by when bullying takes place.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/12/21/EDND1GRARQ.DTL#ixzz18sgxi6pz

Steven Johnson, director of character education at Santa Clara University’s Markkula Center for Applied Ethics. Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/12/21/EDND1GRARQ.DTL#ixzz18shEcsgb

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Comments
  1. […] 0 Unlike approaches based on ideology, successful anti-bullying programs are quite practical and concrete: They use anonymous surveys to sample the current climate within the school. Then they go about changing the culture of the school by working primarily on bystander behavior. They make it OK for students to report bullying by altering the notion of what students consider tattling. Successful anti-bullying efforts address precursor behaviors to … Read More […]

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